Google Trends: Searches for Women’s March vs. March for Life

By Teagan Dillon • January 31st, 2017

On Jan. 27, Washington, D.C., saw its third major event of the past week as people gathered for the 43rd annual March for Life to protest abortion.

But less than a week earlier, on Jan. 21, some 500,000 people gathered in the same place — and at locations all over the country — for the first annual Women’s March to protest for the protection of a woman’s right to choose, among other things.

While the Women’s March was not centered on abortion, it did take a stance in favor of abortion rights. The Women’s March released a policy document stating that the march supported “open access to safe, legal, affordable abortion and birth control for all people.” One day after the inauguration of Donald Trump, it drew massive crowds not only to the nation’s capital but also to cities around the world.

Here’s a comparison of the amount of Google searches globally in the past 10 days for both the Women’s March and the March for Life. Both peaked on their respective march days, but the Women’s March generated nearly four times as many searches on its protest day than the March for Life did.


In addition, the Women’s March showed continued interest in the days following the protest. Since it was the first of its kind, it most likely drew questions about its crowd size, platform and mission. Also happening to fall on President Trump’s first day in office, it was a rally against his past statements and actions that many deemed misogynistic and reprehensible.

On the other hand, in its 43rd year, the March for Life has become a more established, well-known protest with imaginably fewer questions surrounding its premise. This year, however, Vice President Mike Pence became the first vice president to speak at the rally.

While the Women’s March did take a pro-abortion stance, its platform included a wide range of social issues, such as immigration reform, healthcare reform and LGBTQ rights, that provided pro-life men and women a chance to rally for other issues.

Here’s how the topics fared in Indiana on Google search:


Google Trends: Trump and Pence Win the Election … and Search, Too

By Mike Reilley • January 5th, 2017

If Google searches are any indication, it’s no surprise that Indiana Governor Mike Pence is headed to Washington, D.C., as vice president.

Pence easily outdistanced Democratic VP candidate Tim Kaine in Google searches over the past year, both nationally and in Indiana, according to analysis of Google search data.

The charts below illustrate a “normalization” of searches for Pence, which peaked last summer with his selection by Donald Trump as running mate. He also saw considerable peaks during the VP debate and, of course, Election Day and its aftermath.

Google Searches for Mike Pence and Tim Kaine in the U.S. (past year)




Google Searches in Indiana for Mike Pence and Tim Kaine (past year)


Google Searches for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in the U.S. (past year)


Census: Recession Recovery, Jobs Stunt Indiana’s Population Growth

By Mike Reilley • January 5th, 2017

Indiana’s population grew by an estimated 20,285 residents in 2015, for a 0.3 percent increase that boosted its population to an estimated 6.6 million people statewide, according to Census Bureau numbers.

But the state’s population is growing at about half the rate it did during the 1990s, continuing a trend that began during the 2007 recession, statistics show. Some experts say the state isn’t adding jobs fast enough since the recession.

Indiana’s population mirrors that of some its border states. But one, Illinois, has begun losing population because of jobs, crime, high taxation and other cost-of-living factors.